DIE BRÜDER KARAMASOW (THE BROTHERS KARAMAZOV)

Dostojewsky, F.M. (Dostoevsky, Fedor Mikhailovich)

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Price: $4,500.00


Place Published: Leipzig
Publisher: Verlag von Fr. Wilh. Grunow
Date Published: 1884
Edition: First German Edition
Book Id: 1641

Description

Four octavo volumes; publisher's red cloth, with titles stamped in gilt on spines and front panels, with floral decorations stamped in black and gray to same; without half-titles (as issued); 267pp, [4] ads; 272; 298; 333, [3] ads. Barest hint of sunning to spines, with some faint foxing to upper text edges; faint offset (likely from a piece of paper inserted) to pp.221-222 in Vol.2; overall, a very Near Fine set.

Comments

Stunning copy of the first edition in German of 'Brat'ia Karamazovy' (1879-80), and the first translation into any language. The book was issued in three different bindings: paper wrappers, cloth, and half-leather. A simultaneous cloth edition, the issue published by the Leipzig national-liberal newspaper DIE GRENZBOTEN, was published the same year, issued with half-title pages with the newspaper's name that were not present in the set issued in red cloth. The first French translation followed in 1888, and the novel did not appear in English until 1912. Easily the most widely-read of Dostoevsky's work, after 'Crime and Punishment.' The author spent nearly two years writing his final novel, first published as a serial in 'The Russian Messenger' and completed in November of 1880; he intended it to be the first part in an epic story cycle, but he died less than four months after its publication. Filmed several times, most notably the Oscar-nominated adaptation directed by Richard Brooks (1958), starring Yul Brynner and Maria Schell. Rare; no copies of this set in the trade (2016), with OCLC showing no holdings in American institutions, and less than a handful overseas.


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By This Publisher: Verlag von Fr. Wilh. Grunow
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